It’s time to end the Palin bashing

The Dems have no moral ground to continue their Palin-bashing

Once upon a time, we learned that President Clinton, on the phone to a congressman and talking about the merits of sending U.S. ground troops into Bosnia (without a U.N. coalition or act of Congress) was being orally gratified by a woman young enough to be his daughter.

His lovely wife, Hillary, cried foul, clinging to some theory about a “vast, right-wing conspiracy” which was behind it all. In spite of the evidence, in her eyes Bill was innocent.

As history shows, President Clinton was later impeached as a consequence of lying while under oath.

All along the way, the Democrats and the DNC continued supporting President Clinton in the face of the damning evidence.

With so much fodder to drool over,  it would appear the nation – or at least the Republicans – should still be bashing Bill over his behavior and Hillary’s conspiracy theories – even after all these years.

Yet as time passed the incident, the stained dress and the vast right wing conspiracy has faded into the background. The nation has decided to move on to other important matters.

Diverting attention

You would think that since the 2008 campaigns are over the Dems would have pulled their dogs off of Sarah Palin.  Apparently they believe they have some kind of moral bone to chew on.

However, in reality, the Dems lost the moral legs to stand on a long time ago.

Today, Ms. Bill Clinton is Secretary of State and what a fine job she is doing.  We have political hack jobs like Nancy Pelosi  who is allowed to run among civilians without a leash. Then there is Barney Frank and Chris Dodd who supported policies which brought us the GSE meltdown (Fannie-Freddie) and are culpable of pulling off the crime of the century.

So while America has to deal with Pelosi, Frank and Dodd, who together are driving this country on the short and dead end road to ruin, the only thing the critics who have aligned themselves with the DNC can think about is who?  Sarah Palin?

What a stinking pile of hypocrisy.

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  1. Ah, ha. The attacks on Sarah Palin are really attacks on what the Republican party has become: a joke. A dangerous joke.

  2. Subjective.

    Here; let me quantify some things to act as a contrast against baseless editorializing so we can have a firm basis for an adult discussion.

    Shouldn’t you be calling the President’s policies which are driving up the federal deficit to levels beyond that of any government in the history of this planet “dangerous”?

    What about Nancy Pelosi’s characterization of “Astroturf” to describe grass-roots efforts to assemble and communicate disagreement to disconnected elected officials (including her)? Isn’t that “dangerous”?

    Would you consider handing over our freedoms to our government “dangerous”?

    Is having a naive, inexperienced, immature, charismatic, arrogant and narcissistic community organizer as president of the United States “dangerous”?

  3. You’ve been watching too much Fox “news.”

    What caused the huge deficit?

    There’s 700 billion dollars that was handed over to Henry Paulson last year with virtually no oversight or restrictions as to how it would be spent. They might just as well flushed it down the toilet.

    There’s about 200 billion dollars from the stimulus bill. Most economists agreed that the spending was necessary to slow the free-falling economy.

    There’s about 550 billion dollars to pay interest on the debt, most of which is from the massive deficits of Reagan, Bush Sr, and Bush Jr. In case you didn’t know, Reagan tripled the debt, Rush Jr doubled it. Funny how all of a sudden so many right-wingers are concerned about the debt when they never said a word before.

    Then there’s the decreased revenue stream because so many people are now unemployed. The government is spending a lot on unemployment payments, also.

    There’s also the cost of the wars which previously wasn’t included in budgets.

    Obama is a good president. He’s extremely intelligent, pragmatic, and relatively uncorrupted. You right-wingers voted into office someone who was a failed businessman, had never done anything worthwhile in his life, had no evidence of being competent. You “values voters” have already destroyed our country. Obama is doing his best to salvage what’s left.

    • RE:You’ve been watching too much Fox “news.”
      Your powers of remote observation is a bit flawed but no matter. Regardless of the source the information is a matter of historical record. I can’t make the stuff up.

      RE:What caused the huge deficit?

      Simple: flawed policies pursued by the GSEs Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac as overseen and defended by Democrat Barney Frank.

      In 1995, during the Clinton administration, the GSEs like Fannie Mae began receiving government tax incentives for purchasing mortgage backed securities which included loans to low income borrowers.

      In September of 1999, Fannie Mae eases the credit requirements to encourage banks to extend home mortgages to individuals whose credit is not good enough to qualify for conventional loans.

      As you probably know, the “700 billion dollars that was handed over to Henry Paulson last year with virtually no oversight or restrictions as to how it would be spent” comes from Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008.

      The law was enacted in response to the sub-prime mortgage crisis. It authorizes the United States Secretary of the Treasury to spend up to US$700 billion to purchase distressed assets, especially mortgage-backed securities, and make capital injections into banks.

      The subprime mortgage crisis is an ongoing real estate and financial crisis triggered by a dramatic rise in mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures in the United States, with major adverse consequences for banks and financial markets around the globe.

      The crisis, which has its roots in the closing years of the 20th century, became apparent in 2007 and has exposed pervasive weaknesses in financial industry regulation and the global financial system.

      Approximately 80% of U.S. mortgages issued in recent years to subprime borrowers were adjustable-rate mortgages. When U.S. house prices began to decline in 2006-07, refinancing became more difficult and as adjustable-rate mortgages began to reset at higher rates, mortgage delinquencies soared. Securities backed with subprime mortgages, widely held by financial firms, lost most of their value. The result has been a large decline in the capital of many banks and U.S. government sponsored enterprises, (GSEs) tightening credit around the world.

      The 700 billion is only a small fraction of the huge deficit which many now estimate to be approximately 12 trillion dollars.

      • The bailout of Fannie and Freddie was 85 billion dollars. While a lot of money, that was only a small part of the problem.

        You can honestly blame Clinton for the failed economy by signing the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999, which repealed the Glass-Steagall Act and allowed banks to become high stakes gamblers. He also signed the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000, which allowed the trading of commodities by speculators, and resulted in record high gas prices and soaring food prices.

        You can blame Barney Franks until you’re blue in the face, but that doesn’t make it true. What about Bush’s push for an “ownership society?”

        No, what people said wasn’t the cause of the collapse of our economy. Deregulation and lack of oversight was.

  4. RE:The bailout of Fannie and Freddie was 85 billion dollars. While a lot of money, that was only a small part of the problem.
    Agreed.

    RE:You can honestly blame Clinton for the failed economy by signing the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999, which repealed the Glass-Steagall Act and allowed banks to become high stakes gamblers. He also signed the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000, which allowed the trading of commodities by speculators, and resulted in record high gas prices and soaring food prices.
    I did not know about the 2nd one. Good call.

    RE:You can blame Barney Franks until you’re blue in the face, but that doesn’t make it true. What about Bush’s push for an “ownership society?”
    Dang. I thought we were getting ready to find common ground on all issues, but for this one, I have to disagree. … and I doubt I will turn blue in the face.

    On Sept. 10, 2003, Rep. Frank objected, stating, “Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are not in a crisis. The more people, in my judgment, exaggerate a threat of safety and soundness, the more people conjure up the possibility of serious financial losses to the treasury, which I do not see. I think we see entities that are fundamentally sound financially” But the more pressure there is, then the less I think we will see in terms of affordable housing.” The more people exaggerate these problems, the more pressure there is on these companies, the less we will see in terms of affordable housing.” (Stephen Labaton, “New Agency Proposed To Oversee Freddie Mac And Fannie Mae,” The New York Times, 9/11/03)

    April 2004: Rep. Frank ignores the warnings, accusing the Administration of creating an “artificial issue.” At a speech to the Mortgage Bankers Association conference, Rep. Frank said “people tend to pay their mortgages. I don’t think we are in any remote danger here. This focus on receivership, I think, is intended to create fears that aren’t there.” (”Frank: GSE Failure A Phony Issue,” American Banker, 4/21/04)

    You can read the GSE Meltdown timeline here if you wish:
    http://rightamerican.wordpress.com/gse-meltdown-time-line/

    RE:No, what people said wasn’t the cause of the collapse of our economy. Deregulation and lack of oversight was.
    Yep. But it was identified early in 2002 and there were attempts to prevent it. Those attempts were thwarted. It’s a matter of history, now.

    Wow. We agree on 3 out of 4 ! Not bad. 🙂

    Here’s another: http://rightamerican.wordpress.com/2008/10/03/democrat-quotes-about-the-health-of-fannie-mae-and-freddie-mac/

    • Come on, Ben… From 2003-2007, the Republicans controlled the House, the Senate, the Executive branch, and the Judicial branches of government. Do you really think they gave a damn about what Barney Frank said in a speech?

      • Their majority was thin. Not like the majority the Dems now enjoy, so yes, did they care. Unfortunately for all of us they cared far too much. Frank was given great power over Freddie and Fannie and he protected them like a mother bear. His former lover held a high position at Freddie (I recall) and Ben nails it on what happened and how it happened.

      • From the above time-line:

        In May 2006, Sen. John McCain cosponsored regulations to tighten oversight, stating, “The GSEs need to be reformed without delay.”

        The bill passed the Republican-controlled committee on a party-line vote, with all Democrats voting in opposition. The Democrats killed the measure in Committee by threatening a Democrat filibuster to prevent a full Senate Vote. The legislation was subsequently withdrawn.

        The bill was re-introduced in 2007 (S.1100) when it was referred to the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. At the time, the committee is made up of the following members:

        * Chairman: Senator Christopher Dodd [D-CT]
        * Ranking member: Sen. Richard Shelby [R-AL]
        * Sen. Daniel Akaka [D-HI]
        * Sen. Evan Bayh [D-IN]

        The bill never made its way out of this committee.

        So, as we can see, in spite of the fact that from 2003-2007 with the Republicans controlling the House, the Senate, the Executive branch, and the Judicial branches of government, the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs held the power.

        • [The bill never made its way out of this committee.]

          That’s because it was a crappy bill. Bush would have vetoed it. What did pass was the Federal Housing Finance Reform Act of 2007 just a few months after the Democrats took control of Congress.

          • Weak argument. I roll my eyes feeling the flush of victory.

          • Sponsored by Barney Frank, HR-1427 Federal Housing Finance Reform Act of 2007 never became law.

            Introduced March 09, 2007, it made it out of committee, saw 24 amendments.

            On May 22, 2007 the bill passed in the House of Representatives by roll call vote. The totals were 313 Ayes, 104 Nays, 15 Present/Not Voting.

            It died in the Senate.

            For 40 years up until the 1994 elections. Republicans then had control for 12 years, until Dems again won the majority in both House & senate in Nov. 2006.

            I advance the idea the problems plaguing America are due to 40 years of Democrat control of Congress.

      • Back to Frank:

        February 2004: Then-CEA Chairman Mankiw cautions Congress to “not take [the financial market’s] strength for granted.” Again, the call from the Administration was to reduce this risk by “ensuring that the housing GSEs are overseen by an effective regulator.” (N. Gregory Mankiw, Op-Ed, “Keeping Fannie And Freddie’s House In Order,” Financial Times, 2/24/04)

        April 2004: Rep. Frank ignores the warnings, accusing the Administration of creating an “artificial issue.” At a speech to the Mortgage Bankers Association conference, Rep. Frank said “people tend to pay their mortgages. I don’t think we are in any remote danger here. This focus on receivership, I think, is intended to create fears that aren’t there.” (”Frank: GSE Failure A Phony Issue,” American Banker, 4/21/04)

      • Still more on Frank:

        Frank’s fingerprints are all over the financial fiasco

        http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2008/09/28/franks_fingerprints_are_all_over_the_financial_fiasco/

        ‘THE PRIVATE SECTOR got us into this mess. The government has to get us out of it.”

        That’s Barney Frank’s story, and he’s sticking to it. As the Massachusetts Democrat has explained it in recent days, the current financial crisis is the spawn of the free market run amok, with the political class guilty only of failing to rein the capitalists in. The Wall Street meltdown was caused by “bad decisions that were made by people in the private sector,” Frank said; the country is in dire straits today “thanks to a conservative philosophy that says the market knows best.” And that philosophy goes “back to Ronald Reagan, when at his inauguration he said, ‘Government is not the answer to our problems; government is the problem.’ ”

        In fact, that isn’t what Reagan said. His actual words were: “In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.” Were he president today, he would be saying much the same thing.

  5. … stuff on Barney Frank just doesn’t quit:

    Media Agrees Dems obstructed reform:

    International Herald Tribune: “Democratic takeover of Congress was major victory for Fannie and Freddie … Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two mortgage finance giants, which have been recovering from accounting scandals, had faced the possibility of tight new oversight laws pushed largely by Republicans. But some powerful Democrats had resisted, preferring to promote the companies’ housing mission over tighter capital standards and portfolio limits. (International Herald Tribune, 11/8/06)

    American Banker: “Democrats Oppose White House plan to strengthen Fannie and Freddie oversight.” In late summer Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson Jr. began an effort to reach an agreement in the Senate, where Democrats oppose a White House-favored provision that would force Fannie and Freddie Mac to slash their mortgage portfolios. (American Banker, 12/1/06)

    Origination News: “Until recently, the administration and Sen. Shelby have pushed for limits on the size of the GSE portfolios, which Democrats opposed. Now it appears that Secretary Paulson will insist on language that would allow the new GSE regulator to use systemic risk considerations in determining proper size of the portfolios. But the Democrats see systemic risk as a code word for portfolio limits.” (Origination News, 12/1/06)

    • Yeah, it’s all Barney Franks fault. If you try hard enough, you can find opinions to support any crazy theory. There were feeble attempts by both Democrats and Republicans to end the risky lending, but Republicans had power and I don’t recall any Democratic filibusters that stopped it.

      And claiming Henry Paulson tried to reform the system for the better is like trying to claim Saddam Hussein tried to promote world peace.

      The fact is, greed dominates business, and when you don’t have regulation to limit greed, people abuse the system. That’s exactly what happened with our economy. The deregulation — especially the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999 and the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000 deregulated the system and repealed safeguards that were put in place during the Great Depression. While the failure of Fannie and Freddie cost us a lot of money, they were a small part of the total damage.

      So if you want to honestly blame a Democrat, blame Clinton. He signed the deregulation.

      • But this isn’t just crazy theory to support opinion; it’s a matter of public record.

        As attractive as it is, to simply blame Clinton distorts the facts. To blame the 1977 signing of The Community Reinvestment Act by President Carter on the meltdown also distorts the facts.

        What is wrong is the defense of these flawed policies in the face of the evidence that they are doing harm to you and me… i.e. this country.

        RE:The fact is, greed dominates business, and when you don’t have regulation to limit greed, people abuse the system.

        I could not agree more. You and I could devise the most perfect system on paper this world has seen, but when you introduce people into the design all hell breaks loose.

        The bottom line: Stop trying to equalize through policy. It is the design of a socialist. It has never worked. Ever.

  6. Great job, Ben!

    • “Just the facts, Ma’am”

      … and I’d like to point out the lack of inflammatory rhetoric and personal attacks of this conversation.

      Contrast this to : http://rutherfordl.wordpress.com/2009/10/10/sarah-palin-just-wants-to-help/

      or to : http://rutherfordl.wordpress.com/2009/10/14/is-glenn-beck-an-intellectual/

      Lots of slamming, lots of opinion, but little substance to advance understanding.

      This in no way is meant to slam Rutherford; just the comments. I actually respect his views on some things but he seems to be content with engaging in trash talk directed his way rather than advancing ideas to lead to a common ground.

      HippieProf is committed to finding common ground.

      We need that.

      Anyone here remember the days of post WW-II when we were actually united?

      Soon after, the Lord’s Prayer was banned in schools. It went down hill from there.

    • Thanks anamericanidiot. I try. 🙂

    • I assumed the comment was directed at me. Sorry Ben. I should learn a lesson here.

  7. I should probably be known as Ben, The Emu. 😉

    • Other than working yetesrday nad gathering signatures for a Washington State petition to stop giving drivers licenses to Illegals, my weekend has been good.For Powell to endorse Obama doesn’t surprise me a bit. I never took him for much of a conservative and laugh today at how the left, who not too long ago was railing against him and denigrating him in ever yway imagineable, now see him as “redeemed.”Powell shows his shallowness by then bashing Sarah Palin as not ready to be president hen she is running for Vice President and Obama, who has no experience, he considers ready.He can say it is not about race all he wants, it is completely obvious that race is the dominant factor.A bit off subject, but I made the local newspaper today, along with some other bloggers. I just stopped on the way home and got a copy of the paper and was amazed to see it beginning on the front page!

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